(Six-minute read)

One can place the blame and no doubt the blame will be played on many a doorstep for Brexit.  For me, it can be placed squarely on the shoulders of inequality.

All sides in the Brexit debate seem to see a Free Trade Agreement with the EU as being essential to England’s prosperity… but the question will be whose prosperity is that?

Is it Free Trade that will benefit the big corporations and banks?

Will leaving economically revitalise depressed areas?

Thames Water is still fighting a losing battle fixing our hundreds of years old sewage system. The National Grid relies on dwindling supplies of natural gas and an excess of clean electricity from Scotland. The NHS is creaking at its foundations. Trains are stuffed full of sweaty people, with people paying more for a rail ticket than a flight to Madrid. Millions of people rely on food banks to not starve. Charity shops are an essential part of the High Street for clothing the working classes, with thousands homeless, with a murder a day, while taxpayers money is ploughed into new aircraft carriers and worthless nuclear subs.

So stark is the evidence that Britain is going south-rapidly one would assume that by now  Britain would face up to its plight, there is no easy model for the redevelopment of the national economy.

The U.K. will not be part of the single market after it officially exits the EU and will have to access clients in the bloc like any other “third country.”Résultat de recherche d'images pour "pictures of england after brexit"

The U.K trades from a past no longer hold the respect of the World.

No matter what side of the arguments your on the UK’S RECENT ECONOMIC success originates from ITS MEMBERSHIP OF THE EU.

Theresa May has frequently been jaw-dropping in the incompetence and infighting of its political elites, but it is difficult to imagine things getting this bad.

As the English Government use deficit hysteria to collude in protecting private profit above all else, neither nationality nor geography will ultimately provide safeguards.

Britain will sink into “poverty as fast as the far east rises”.

SURELY IF MR CORBETT HAD THE BOTTLE TO STAND UP IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS AND CLEARLY SAY THAT THE LABOUR PARTY WILL NOT SUPPORT THE DRAFT AGREEMENT.  THEY WOULD BE IN POWER IN THE MORNING. 

The question of whether there is now a chance that Brexit may not ultimately go ahead is irrelevant as all the major players in the City of London are already making decisions.

London as a financial centre is not dead, nor will it be, but it’s dying.  I don’t think even by reversing Brexit it will be able to revive it, as worldwide technology is eroding its importance. 

However, not everyone is in the same boat yet.

There is a colossal opportunity for reform in the EU which it will have to do whether England leaves or not. 

What is needed both in the Uk and Europe is a rejection of the continuation of imperialism by “big and powerful trade interests.”  

Whoever wins the next general election or the forthcoming European elections will face international challenges reaching to the heart of a question that has bedevilled every government since 1945:

What is, or should be, the role of economics in the world?The UK has been a loyal if hardly effective ally of the U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan, says Tisdall.

THIS QUESTION CAN ONLY BE ANSWERED BY THE PEOPLE WHO WORK AND LIVE IN THE ECONOMY.

PROFIT BEFORE PEOPLE NO LONGER WORKS.

Old certainties are being uprooted and new or revived threats are multiplying.

Faced with the prospect of Scottish independence and the inevitable break-up of the United Kingdom.  The country can no longer afford a nuclear deterrent, morally or financially.

Disturbed by this evidence of decline, Britain’s political class comforts itself by arguing the country still leads by example.

It is small consolation for a country that, 100 years ago, was a superpower with a truly global reach that the forthcoming election will be all about isolation or not.

You can rest assured that the campaigns to come will not address foreign policy nor the key 21st-century international issues, such as climate change, they will barely get a mention.

This is not an accident.

Britain’s horizons are narrowing.

Its strength and global ambitions are fading.

Its post-imperial destiny is that of a second-tier power.

When the war of words politicians are using now has died down, reconciliation and pragmatism will win the day. The EU needs the UK and vice versa.

Nobody in their right mind wants to undermine that relationship.

The trick now is not to appear second rate to the DUP that are holding the whole of Britian to ransom.

All human comments appreciated. All like clicks chucked in the bin.

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