Tags

, , , , ,

 

(Two-minute read)

There is no doubt that climate change is a complex subject and is challenging us in ways we’ve never seen before.

Based on what scientists understand, the changes we are seeing today are far more rapid than anything that has occurred in our planet’s history.

How best to depict the climate emergency is down to the media to ensure that the images publish accurately and appropriately convey the climate crisis that we face.

To address Climate Change with or without an agreement is going to cost trillions.

when trying to depict what cannot always be seen.showing the direct impact of environmental issues on people’s daily lives as well as trying to indicate the scale of the impact,the effect of the reporting and how we perceive the risks. to unearth photography beyond the usual keywords of climate change, heatwave and floods.

The problem is:  No one, No country, No government, No Organisation, No economy, wants to pay for it. T

THIS ISSUE IS CRITICAL IF WE ARE TO ACHIEVE ANYTHING WORTHWHILE.

Everyone is, however, paying lip service to the problem.

Delay action will drastically increase the costs of taking action, but no one ever talks about how the funding required can be achieved.

Why?

Because the costs will not be shared evenly.

The trillions have to come from somewhere.

The world’s most powerful institutions are still engaged in a game of lethal procrastination that threatens to speed up global ecological collapse and sow chaos throughout human civilization in the decades to come.

The world’s biggest asset managers remain heavily invested in climate-polluting industries ― and do little if anything to convince those companies to change.

Forceful engagement with the companies in these sectors to hasten their transition to low carbon technologies must occur.

A Bloomberg New Energy Finance chart shows investments in new solar, wind and other non-hydroelectric power projects dropping from 2017 to 2018. (Photo: Bloomberg New Energy Finance)A Bloomberg New Energy Finance chart shows investments in new solar, wind and other non-hydroelectric power projects dropping from 2017 to 2018. (Photo: Bloomberg New Energy Finance)

Clearly, it’s not enough.

At this juncture, to meet the growing demand for green and social investments we need to have a dual focus on maximizing the potential of our current financial instruments, while also creating space for the next wave of innovations for sustainable growth.

We all know that there is already technology that exits, or that are coming on stream to tackle the problem head-on. Not in thirty years from now.

This blog as I am sure are others have been posting a solution that addresses the fair spreading of the costs worldwide. 

( See: 0.05% World Aid commission)

All human comments appreciated. All like clicks and abuse chucked in the bin.

 

 

.